Category: Wellbeing

Cancer diagnosis just a breath away

From alcohol analysis to medical diagnosis, the breathlyser may help save lives in more ways than one Steph Nash Specific compounds found in exhaled breath may help diagnose lung cancer in its early stages, according to a study released earlier this year. Professor Nir Peled from Tel Aviv University, Israel, and his team of researchers have developed a device that is both able to detect cancer cells in human breath, and discriminate between an early stage and late stage of the disease. The device, which is currently being modified to support USB ports, is called the NaNose, and works...

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Winter wearables take stage for Sydney Fashion Weekend

Fashionistas and shopaholics alike flocked last month to Sydney’s annual fashion weekend in Moore Park. Sydney Observer got a front row glimpse of the latest and greatest trends in store for winter 2014. Steph Nash Walking into the Royal Hall of Industries was like walking into a barn during feeding time. Only there were no animals to be found – just herds of bargain-hunting women, wearing stilletos and brandishing their wallets. Sydney Fashion Weekend promised cheaper than cheap discounts on a variety of exclusive Sydney labels. The hall in Moore Park was chock full of clothing stalls, with a...

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Body talk

The skin is the largest organ of the body and during winter skin is subject to the damaging and drying effects of cold, wintry weather. Eileen Campbell It comes as no surprise then that winter wreaks havoc on our skin and those with sensitive skin, dry skin or conditions like eczema and rosacea are particularly affected. However, by changing how you care for your skin in winter you can avoid the itchy, dry, scaly and red skin that becomes a common occurrence during the colder months. Here are some steps you can take to avoid dry, itchy skin and...

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Avoiding the perils of dental erosion

Dental erosion is the irreversible loss of tooth structure due to chemical dissolution by acid. Ian Sweeney It can be found in people of all ages and is typically seen in the enamel of teeth; however it may proceed to the underlying dentine if the process continues. The most common cause of dental erosion is the consumption of acidic foods and drinks. Any food and drink with an acidic pH may cause teeth to demineralise and breakdown. Sports drinks, carbonated drinks, orange and apple juices are common culprits. Frequency rather than total intake of acidic drinks is seen as the greatest factor in dental erosion. Saliva is a natural buffer to the acid we consume as well as acid produced by bacteria in our mouths. Drinks vary in their resistance to the buffering effect of saliva. Studies show that fruit juices are the most resistant to saliva’s buffering effect, followed by, in order: fruit based carbonated drinks and flavoured mineral waters, non fruit based carbonated drinks followed by sparkling mineral waters. A number of medications such as vitamin C, aspirin and some iron preparations are acidic and may contribute towards acid erosion. Dry mouth as a result of some medications may also contribute to erosion. Dehydration from sports training, in combination with acidic sports drinks, may result in quite severe erosion of teeth while the common condition of gastric...

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HEALTH CHECK: FOCUS ON OSTEOPATHY

From multivitamins to osteopathy, alternative medicine has become mainstream. Two-thirds of Australians are expected to use some form of complementary or alternative medicine in 2014, spending up to $1.8 million. Government funding for alternative medicine has skyrocketed over the past 10 years and universities across Australia are running courses in osteopathy, chiropractic science, traditional Chinese medicine and naturopathy. Osteopath at the Osteopathic Centre in Chatswood, Dr Christian Paesano, believes osteopathy plays a critical role in primary healthcare. “We run through quite a lengthy case history during which we go through the reason that people come in. We ask questions...

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